Knox v. Right At Home Southeastern MI Inc. – 16.90

Knox v. Right At Home Southeastern MI Inc.
Digest No. 16.90

Section 421.29; Section 421.32a; Section 421.62; Section 421.33

Cite as: Knox v Right At Home Southeastern MI Inc, unpublished opinion of the Michigan Compensation Appellate Commission, issued July 29, 2016 (Docket No. 15-018792-247172W).

Appeal pending: No
Claimant: Teresa R. Knox
Employer: Right at Home Southeastern MI Inc.
Date of decision: July 29, 2016

View/download the full decision

HOLDING: Under Section 421.32a, the Agency cannot reconsider a prior determination or redetermination more than one year from the date of mailing or personal service of the original determination on the disputed issue. All adjudications issued by the Agency that are contrary to this rule are void and must be set aside. All ALJ decisions made after the Agency improperly transferred over a case due to a violation of Section 421.32a are to be set aside as well.

FACTS: In February 2012, the Unemployment Insurance Agency (UIA) issued a Notice of Determination holding the claimant disqualified from receipt of unemployment insurance benefits under Section 421.29(1)(a). In June 2014, more than two years after the February 2012 Determination was issued, the Agency, on its own motion, reconsidered the Determination and issued a June 25, 2014 Redetermination. A March 2015 Redetermination held the claimant disqualified from receipt of unemployment insurance benefits under the voluntary leaving provisions of Section 421.29(1)(a) and held the claimant subject to restitution under Section 421.62(a). A November 2015 ALJ decision affirmed the March 2015 Redetermination. The claimant timely appealed to the Michigan Compensation Appellate Commission (MCAC) from the November 2015 ALJ decision.

DECISION: The November 2015 ALJ decision is set aside. The June 25, 2014 Redetermination and all subsequent Agency adjudications are set aside. The February 2012 Determination is a final ruling on this matter. Therefore Claimant is disqualified from receipt of benefits but Claimant is not subject to restitution.

RATIONALE:

Section 421.32a(2) provides that the Agency may, for good cause, reconsider a prior determination or redetermination after the 30 day period has expired, but that a reconsideration shall not be made unless the request is filed with the UIA, or reconsideration is initiated by the UIA with notice to the interested parties, within one year from the date of mailing or personal service of the original determination on the disputed issue.

The Michigan Supreme Court held in Roman Cleanser v Murphy, 386 Mich 698 (1972) that the doctrines of res judicata and collateral estoppel apply to an Agency ruling that has become “final” under Section 421.32a(2). As a result, the February 2012 Determination, which did not include any ruling on restitution under Section 421.62(a), is a final ruling. Therefore the June 25, 2014 Redetermination is void and must be set aside as the Agency had no legal authority to issue that ruling. All adjudications issued by the Agency after the June 25, 2014 Redetermination are void and must be set aside.

In addition, because the June 25, 2014 Redetermination was not in accordance with Section 421.32a, under Section 421.33 (“An appeal from a redetermination issued . . . in accordance with section 32a or a matter transferred for hearing and decision in accordance with section 32a shall be referred to the Michigan administrative hearing system for assignment to an administrative law judge”), the Agency was without authority to transfer the matter for hearing and assignment to an ALJ.

Digest author: Winne Chen, Michigan Law, Class of 2017
Digest updated: 10/31/2017

 

MESC v Monkman Construction – 2.20

MESC v Monkman Construction
Digest no. 2.20

Sections 18(d)(2), 32a

Cite as: MESC v Monkman Constr, unpublished per curiam Court of Appeals, issued May 7, 1996 (Docket No. 176053).

Appeal pending: No
Claimant: N/A
Employer: Monkman Construction
Docket no.: L92-02019-2287
Date of decision: May 7, 1996

View/download the full decision

COURT OF APPEALS HOLDING: Where employer failed to request redetermination of its tax rate for more than one year after issuance of rate determination, reconsideration was time barred and Referee properly dismissed case for lack of jurisdiction.

FACTS: Employer’s contribution rate was set at 10 percent and a determination to that effect was issued on February 14, 1990. Employer failed to submit a quarterly report for 1989. The 30 day protest period ended March 16, 1990. Employer submitted the missing report on March 27, 1990, but did not request redetermination of its rate until November 19, 1991, more than a year after the determination was issued.

DECISION: Redetermination of tax rate denied due to lack of jurisdiction.

RATIONALE: Section 32a(2) bars appeals filed more than one year after prior decision or determination. Statutory time restrictions on seeking review of unemployment tax assessments are jurisdictional. As a result, the “good cause” analysis was inapposite.

Digest Author: Board of Review (original digest here)
Digest Updated: 7/99

Contemporary Life Services v MESC – 2.12

Contemporary Life Services v MESC
Digest no. 2.12

Sections 13a, 32a, 41

Cite asContemporary Life Services v MESC, unpublished per curiam Court of Appeals of Michigan, issued May 24, 1994 (Docket No. 151027).

Appeal pending: No
Claimant: N/A
Employer: Contemporary Life Services
Docket no.: L89-07129-2075
Date of decision: May 24, 1994.

View/download the full decision

COURT OF APPEALS HOLDING: Where employer requested reclassification from contributing to reimbursing status more than one year after notice of determination of status was mailed, the one year limitation bars retroactive reconsideration of employer’s status.

FACTS: Employer was classified as a contributing employer for failure to answer question 7 on form MESC 1010 even though elsewhere on that form the employer attested it was a tax exempt entity under 26 USC 501(a). The instructions for question 7 specifically stated failure to answer would result in classification as a contributing employer. Determination of contributing employer status was mailed on January 31, 1986. Thereafter, employer failed to file quarterly reports and received notice of this lapse on March 8, 1989. Employer requested reclassification on March 16, 1989. Employer had accumulated arrearages of unpaid unemployment payroll taxes between 1985 and 1989. Employer argued one year time limit should be tolled until March 8, 1989, or that the time limit should be extended on equitable grounds.

DECISION: Employer’s request for redetermination time barred under Section 32a.

RATIONALE: The March 16, 1989 letter was not filed within a year of the January 31, 1986 determination. Also, the employer was not entitled to equitable relief since it set the chain of events in motion by failing to properly complete form MESC 1010. Employer should have known when it received quarterly report forms that something was amiss. Employer is presumed to know the law as it relates to the operation of its business.

Digest Author: Board of Review (original digest here)
Digest Updated: 7/99

R F Molitoris, DDS v MESC – 2.13

R F Molitoris, DDS v MESC
Digest no. 2.13

Sections 11(g), 18(d)32a

Cite asR F Molitoris, DDS v MESC, unpublished opinion of the Macomb County Circuit Court, issued January 21, 1993 (Docket No. 92-3446-AE).

Appeal pending: No
Claimant: Wanda Forbes
Employer: R.F. Molitoris, D.D.S.
Docket no.: L90-06544-2224
Date of decision: January 21, 1993

View/download the full decision

CIRCUIT COURT HOLDING: An interstate claimant’s entitlement to benefits is determined by the state in which the claim is made. The Agency is not precluded from redetermining an erroneous contribution rate if such redetermination is made within one year of the issuance of the initial rate.

FACTS: Claimant Wanda Forbes worked for involved employer and another Michigan employer in 1981 before moving to Nevada where she worked, then filed a combined wage claim for benefits, in September 1982. The Michigan employers provided information but this employer was not notified of charges to its account until 1985. Employer challenged charges and an adjustment of $898 was made for 1986. Employer requested redetermination of rate in 1989 which was denied as untimely. Agency subsequently discovered employer had received $898 credit for years 1987 through 1990 in error. Nevertheless, the Agency only recalculated the 1990 rate because redetermination of others was time barred under Section 32a.

DECISION: Redetermination of 1990 rate affirmed.

RATIONALE: Employer lacked standing to challenge award of benefits because under MESA Section 11(g), which conforms with 26 USC 3304, her entitlement to benefits was controlled by laws of Nevada (paying state). Agency had the authority to redetermine employer’s 1990 contribution rate within one year of its issuance. Erroneous rates for 1987 through 1989 could not be redetermined because of the one year time limit.

Digest Author: Board of Review (original digest here)
Digest Updated: 7/99